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RDI® for Dads

Learning how to guide your child with RDI® – like any skill – takes practice. When you take the time and effort to learn, practice, and implement the skills needed to guide your child, you, your child, and your entire family will reap the benefits.

Am I Overparenting or Overcompensating?

Parents that set boundaries are less apt to overcompensate for their children, but many parents find it difficult to set limits and end up overcompensating for their child when they are stressed or tired, feel guilty, or simply because they feel that it won’t work. But setting limits can improve your child’s behavior, reduce their anxiety, and help them to develop a greater ability for self-regulation. It also teaches them respect for and consideration of others.

The Emotional Roller Coaster of COVID-19

In this webinar, Certified RDI® Consultants Kat Lee and Dr. Sarah Wayland discuss how the pandemic has affected both us as parents, and our children. During the last two years or so, a lot of parents have struggled just to get their kids through each day. Besides the emotional impact of COVID itself on both adults and children, there are many other struggles to contend with.

Is Your Child Exhibiting Signs of Autism? When Should You Seek Out a Diagnosis?

There are a lot of different thoughts and feelings happening when you think your child might have autism. Sometimes it’s difficult to know whether your child is on the autism spectrum, if there’s a developmental delay, or if your child is just developing just a little later than usual. When it comes to what may be autism symptoms, what causes you to seek out a diagnosis? 

Communication with Autism

In this webinar from the RDIconnect online learning community, Kat Lee interviews RDI® Program Certified Consultant Blair Armstrong on communication in the home. They discuss the differences between imperative and declarative communication, why parent training is so important in the RDI® program, and what myths about autism and communication are being perpetuated in the autism community.

Steps to Self-Compassion for Kids

Self-compassion is essential. It nourishes our mental well-being by reducing anxiety and depression. It keeps us from making self-limiting choices and from thinking thoughts about ourselves that can stifle our motivation and initiative.

When Stimming Turns Violent

Your priority in addressing violent stimming is to remain calm and to keep your child and family safe. It may feel incredibly difficult when you are in the middle of an aggressive behavioral episode with your child but know that there are things that you can do to help the situation.

What is My Role as a Parent in Autism Treatment?

Do you look at your therapist or consultant as the authority that possesses the main role in your child’s autism treatment?  You are the one that holds the dreams for your child’s development in life, and you are also the one that can best provide home-based opportunities for your child’s mental and self-growth.

Entertaining Your Autistic Child

It’s the ‘easiest’ way to live with your child in the short term. You take him out and do the things he likes as you try to avoid him stimming, nagging or even throwing tantrums. Life then develops a pattern, where any time parent and child have together is spent doing entertaining activities because the child is ‘happy’ and it causes less conflict. But take a minute to ask yourself: “What is my child is getting out of these experiences?”

The Roles of Mom and Dad in RDI®

As an RDI® consultant in Asia, specifically Indonesia, I see a lot of dads struggling in the beginning of the program because of the cultural beliefs that influence family life and interpersonal relationship. Even though things have changed so much in the younger generation, in many traditional Asian families the father’s role is primarily to provide material support for the family, while the mother’s role is primarily to take care of the children. The father does not usually start a conversation with his children. He tends to be distant. As a result, dad has difficulties learning how to play, have casual conversation and build close relationships with his child; this becomes even more challenging when they have a child with special conditions.

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