Parenting

All Blog Categories

Preparing Autistic Teens for Adulthood: Money Management

Even though this can look different for every autistic person, autistic individuals – especially children, commonly struggle with executive functioning. Individuals with executive dysfunction can lack acquired motivation to achieve goals and prepare for normal events in day-to-day life (i.e., money management), and they often experience difficulties picking up on skills such as organization, planning, and reasoning without guided learning experiences. Despite these challenges, autistic individuals can learn to manage money.

Are You Guilty of Not Letting Your Kids Fly?

As loving parents, we want our children to succeed in life. But sometimes, this pushes us blindly into overcompensation. We find ourselves frequently sneaking in and organizing our autistic teen’s school work to ensure they have a positive next day in class. Or we continue to do our kid’s laundry because we do not trust that they will do it themselves and that they will end up with no clean clothes in their closet. By not letting our kid fly on their own, we teach them that they are not accountable and lack responsibility. In turn, we presume incompetence, even if it only pertains to some areas of their lives. This can lead our children to feel that independence is either impossible or that they are flawed.

Battling the “Am I Doing Enough” Parenting Guilt Trap – and how to move forward

All parents feel guilty sometimes, but it seems to occur more often when you’re parenting a child who has special needs. You might feel stressed, sad, or even angry or resentful sometimes – and then you feel guilty for having these completely normal emotions! And of course, there are the feelings and worries that go with the types of treatment you choose for your child!

RDI® for Dads

Learning how to guide your child with RDI® – like any skill – takes practice. When you take the time and effort to learn, practice, and implement the skills needed to guide your child, you, your child, and your entire family will reap the benefits.

Am I Overparenting or Overcompensating?

Parents that set boundaries are less apt to overcompensate for their children, but many parents find it difficult to set limits and end up overcompensating for their child when they are stressed or tired, feel guilty, or simply because they feel that it won’t work. But setting limits can improve your child’s behavior, reduce their anxiety, and help them to develop a greater ability for self-regulation. It also teaches them respect for and consideration of others.

The Emotional Roller Coaster of COVID-19

In this webinar, Certified RDI® Consultants Kat Lee and Dr. Sarah Wayland discuss how the pandemic has affected both us as parents, and our children. During the last two years or so, a lot of parents have struggled just to get their kids through each day. Besides the emotional impact of COVID itself on both adults and children, there are many other struggles to contend with.

Is Your Child Exhibiting Signs of Autism? When Should You Seek Out a Diagnosis?

There are a lot of different thoughts and feelings happening when you think your child might have autism. Sometimes it’s difficult to know whether your child is on the autism spectrum, if there’s a developmental delay, or if your child is just developing just a little later than usual. When it comes to what may be autism symptoms, what causes you to seek out a diagnosis? 

Communication with Autism

In this webinar from the RDIconnect online learning community, Kat Lee interviews RDI® Program Certified Consultant Blair Armstrong on communication in the home. They discuss the differences between imperative and declarative communication, why parent training is so important in the RDI® program, and what myths about autism and communication are being perpetuated in the autism community.

Steps to Self-Compassion for Kids

Self-compassion is essential. It nourishes our mental well-being by reducing anxiety and depression. It keeps us from making self-limiting choices and from thinking thoughts about ourselves that can stifle our motivation and initiative.

When Stimming Turns Violent

Your priority in addressing violent stimming is to remain calm and to keep your child and family safe. It may feel incredibly difficult when you are in the middle of an aggressive behavioral episode with your child but know that there are things that you can do to help the situation.

What is My Role as a Parent in Autism Treatment?

Do you look at your therapist or consultant as the authority that possesses the main role in your child’s autism treatment?  You are the one that holds the dreams for your child’s development in life, and you are also the one that can best provide home-based opportunities for your child’s mental and self-growth.

Categories

Pin It on Pinterest